Spotlight on Refugees

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Handicap International is committed to supporting people who are fleeing conflict and natural disaster. Whether they are sheltering within their own countries or residing in countries of first asylum as refugees, our teams are hard at work providing basic and specific aid to people with disabilities and other vulnerable groups. Read about our work with refugees and internally displaced people (IDPs) as well as our other projects in the 11 countries below.

This life-saving work is possible thanks to the generous support of our donors, as well as key funding agencies such as the U.S. Department of State, IKEA Foundation, among others.

Handicap International is an impartial, international aid organization, and we act where needs are greatest. We do not work on refugee resettlement.  

Bangladesh is home to nearly 32,000 refugees.

Bangladesh

Bangladesh

DRC is home to more than 384,000 refugees and 1.5 million internally displaced people.

Democratic Republic of Congo

Democratic Republic of Congo

Ethiopia is home to more than 736,000 refugees.

Ethiopia

Ethiopia

Iraq is home to more than 4.4 million internally displaced people and 277,000 Syrian refugees.

Iraq

Iraq

Jordan is home to more than 664,000 refugees, the majority from Syria.

Jordan

Jordan

Kenya is home to nearly 554,000 refugees, the majority from Somalia and South Sudan.

Kenya

Kenya

Libya is home to more than 9,300 refugees and 434,800 internally displaced people.

Libya

Libya

Pakistan is home to nearly 1.6 million refugees–mainly from Afghanistan–and 1.1 million internally displaced people.

Pakistan

Pakistan

South Sudan is home to nearly 1.8 internally displaced people and more than 260,000 refugees.

South Sudan

South Sudan

4.6 million Syrians have fled the conflict whereas 6.6 million are displaced within the country.

Syria

Syria

Thailand is home to an estimated 111,000 Burmese refugees.

Thailand

Thailand

Handicap International supports internally displaced people and refugees from all but two of the targeted countries in a variety of settings, including within their own country, and in countries of first asylum. In each case, an interruption in their ability to resettle abroad could have significant negative consequences for people who are already extremely vulnerable.

Conditions in many camps are already crowded. To close off even a small avenue for some refugees to leave for a better life seems cruel and unnecessarily harsh.

Jeff Meer, Handicap International U.S. Executive Director on the January 27 Executive Order: Protecting the Nation from Terrorist Attacks by Foreign Nationals